News

2nd December 2020

IFPI mourns former IFPI Deputy Director General, Professor Adrian Sterling

2nd December 2020 – IFPI is saddened to hear of the death of former IFPI Deputy Director General, Professor Adrian Sterling. During his twenty years working at IFPI from 1954 – 1974, Sterling was instrumental in gaining recognition for the rights of record producers worldwide. Sterling was a key member of the IFPI delegation that saw the passing of the historic Rome Convention in 1961 which established the international standard for the protection of sound recordings, live performances and broadcasts. 

An extremely valued member of IFPI, in 1964 Sterling proposed the Copyright Committee which acted as a forerunner to the International Legal Committee (ILC). The ILC continues to meet twice a year, bringing together record company members from around the world to address key legal and policy issues affecting the recording industry.

After 20 years with IFPI, Sterling returned to the Bar in 1974. He continued to be a strong ally to the recording industry and a passionate defender of copyright. 

In an in-depth interview in 2013 looking over his time at IFPI, Sterling recounted some of his special memories and achievements. You can read the piece here.

IFPI sends its condolences to Professor Adrian Sterling’s family, friends and former colleagues.

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In 2020 music consumption rose for a 6th consecutive year, an 8.2% rise on 2019, with fans turning to music to get through 2020. There were 139 billion audio streams, with growth fueled by streaming and by label A&R and marketing investment. Read more: https://bit.ly/3pHR6Yg

Read IFPI’s statement on the @EU_Commission’s Digital Services Act https://www.ifpi.org/ifpi-statement-on-the-european-commissions-digital-services-act/